Why my husband ignores my endometriosis pain?

“Endo-Tool”

Endometriosis for Men

    “Why my husband ignores my endometriosis pain” is a question that many women with endometriosis ask themselves. And it’s a valid question – why does it seem like your husbands, boyfriends, or male partners just don’t get how much pain you’re in?

    Well, I used to be unaware of that too. My wife suffers from stage IV deep infiltrating endometriosis, she also has fibromyalgia disorder.

    My logic use to tell me that endometriosis pain was a bit easier to explain than fibromyalgia pain because of the fact that endometriosis can be physically proven whereas fibromyalgia can not.

    This is how a male brain works.

    Why my husband ignores my endometriosis pain?

    It wasn’t until I started my blog that I began to realize just how serious her pain was. And even though being a man I will never be able to fully understand what my wife is going through, so here is the answer to “why my husband ignores my endometriosis pain”:

    Men and women experience and process pain differently at a neurological level. Women are likely to use emotional words to describe their pain, men use physical words. Men think that women exaggerate their pain as they believe that pain is a sign of weakness.

    But of course, the answer, unfortunately, is more complicated. To begin with, men don’t understand women’s pain, after all, they are not women.

    Men don’t understand women’s pain.

    What I found out during my research for my blog is that men don’t understand women’s pain because men don’t experience female pain.

    This isn’t to say that men can’t feel pain, but the way that men and women experience pain is different.

    For example, men are more likely to experience pain as sharp, localized pain. Women, on the other hand, are more likely to experience additional pain such as diffuse, all-over pain. Women feel more kinds of pain and they feel it on different levels too.

    This difference is due to the fact that men’s and women’s brains are wired differently.

    So, when a man sees his wife in pain, he may not be able to understand why she is in so much pain. And this lack of understanding can lead to a feeling of helplessness and a desire to fix the problem.

    Unfortunately, there is no cure for endometriosis and managing the pain effectively takes time.

    Men don’t experience female pain.

    So, why my husband ignores my endometriosis pain, you ask?

    First and foremost, it’s important to understand that men and women experience pain differently.

    Studies have shown that men and women process pain differently at a neurological level. Women are more likely to use emotional words to describe their pain, while men are more likely to use physical words.

    This difference can make it difficult for men to truly understand the level of pain that women experience.

    When a woman says she’s in “excruciating” pain, a man may not realize that she literally means she’s in the worst pain imaginable. He may think she’s exaggerating, or that she can tough it out.

    Additionally, many men have been socialized to believe that pain is a sign of weakness.

    This belief can make it hard for them to empathize with women who are in pain because they see it as a sign of weakness rather than a legitimate medical condition.

    Finally, it’s important to remember that endometriosis is still a relatively new and unknown condition.

    It wasn’t even officially recognized endometriosis as a medical condition until the 1970s, so there’s still a lot of misinformation and a lack of understanding about the condition.

    This lack of understanding can make it difficult for even well-meaning men to truly understand and empathize with what women with endometriosis are going through.

    Tips for husbands who ignore endometriosis pain.

    What tips can I give to a man who ignores someone else’s pain?

    If you ignore your wife’s pain it means that you don’t understand what she is going through. Try to be more understanding and try to learn about her condition.

    Additionally, it’s important to remember that pain is a legitimate medical condition, not a sign of weakness.

    If you can try to be more understanding and accepting of your wife’s pain, it will go a long way in helping her to feel supported and validated.

    Finally, keep in mind that endometriosis is a relatively new and unknown condition. There is still a lot of misinformation out there about the condition.

    Make an effort to learn about endometriosis and to stay up-to-date on the latest information and treatments. This will help you to be a more informed and supportive husband.

    I can help you with that by giving the first chapter of my book away for free. And because this chapter includes all the comprehensive medical information about endometriosis, it is the perfect opportunity for you to learn more about this condition.

    Get the first chapter of “Endo-Tool: Endometriosis for Men” book FREE. And if you like it, you can get this comprehensive guide to taking charge of your wife’s health discounted at 33%.

    • What is endometriosis?
    • What are the symptoms?
    • What causes endometriosis?
    • What does endometriosis look like?
    • What are the stages?
    • What are the types?
    • What is adenomyosis and how is it related to endometriosis?
    • Why do some women develop severe endo and others don’t?
    • Does endometriosis cause infertility?
    • How is endometriosis diagnosed?
    • Do types and stages affect the treatment?
    • Recurrence of endometriosis after excision surgery.

    FREE Chapter of “Endo-Tool”!

    an Endometriosis for Men book

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      Tips for wives with endometriosis.

      Being husband to a woman with endometriosis for over 10 years, I’ve learned a thing or two about how to support my wife through her pain.

      So what kind of advice can I give to women whose husbands ignore their endometriosis pain?

      First and foremost, it’s important to educate your husband about your condition. Many men still don’t know much about endometriosis, so it’s important to take the time to explain your condition and what you’re going through.

      Additionally, try to be understanding and patient with your husband. I know it can be frustrating when your husband doesn’t seem to understand your pain, but remember that men and women process pain differently.

      It’s important to be patient and to try to explain your pain in a way that your husband can understand.

      If he ignores you or dismisses your pain, it’s important to stand up for yourself.

      Pain is a legitimate medical condition, and you deserve to be taken seriously. If your husband isn’t supportive, it may be helpful to seek out support from friends or family members who can better understand what you’re going through.

      Finally, keep in mind that your husband may not be ignoring your pain on purpose.

      Many men still don’t know much about endometriosis, so they may not understand the gravity of your condition.

      Make an effort to educate your husband about endometriosis and to help him understand what you’re going through. With time and understanding, he should be able to be a more supportive husband.

      To finish off…

      Your husband might not ignore your endometriosis pain. It may be so alien to him that he can’t understand it. So, giving him some tips on how to be more understanding may help your relationship and also help him become a better supporter.

      Get the first chapter of the “Endo-Tool: Endometriosis for Men” book and give it to him. And if he likes it, you can tell him that the rest of the book is dedicated to explaining to him how to cope with your endometriosis, his emotions, and how to better support you in your struggles.

      You can both have a fairly normal relationship. So if you ask yourself “why my husband ignores my endometriosis pain”, I can give you another book called “Supporting a Chronically Ill Partner”, which is going to give him extra information on how to manage your chronic illness, including:

      • A word to your partner.
      • A word to you.
      • Stepping on eggshells.
      • Understanding her needs.
      • How to acknowledge having a chronically ill partner?
      • Acknowledging can be hard.
      • 15 tips on how to do it!

      Get the 1st Chapter FREE!

      Chronic Illness for Partners

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        Lucjan B

        About Me

        Hi, I’m Lucjan! The reason why I decided to create this blog was my beautiful wife, who experienced a lot of pain in life, but also the lack of information about endometriosis and fibromyalgia for men…

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